Templeborough Biomass Power Plant powering a renewable future

Welcome to the Templeborough Biomass Power Plant website where you can find out more about us, up to date information on construction of our Plant, answers to some of the questions we are asked and details of how our project is becoming a part of your local community. Please explore our website and keep coming back as we will regularly update the information for you. If you have any comments or questions that you can’t find the answer to then contact us and we’ll do our best to help.

Templeborough Biomass Power Plant

Generating

0
Megawatts

of green electricity

Supplying

0
Thousand

homes with energy

Saving over

0
Thousand

tons of CO2 a year

We plan to open our renewable energy plant in August 2017 when it will generate just over 41MW of green electricity which is enough to supply 78,000 homes and save over 150,000 tons of CO2 every year. It’s difficult to visualise how much that is but would look the same as 250,000 really big hot air balloons and the saving is equal to 1.75 million plane flights to Paris.

News

New Bridge Across The River Don

It is planned that over the Bank holiday weekend of Saturday 28th to Monday 30th May the old bridge on the site of the new Templeborough Biomass plant will be lifted out…

Project Newsletter No. 2

We want to continue to provide you with our latest news, keeping you up to date with all our activities as well as the progress of our project as it continues to…

Behind the project

Our Biomass power plant is one of 15-20 similar sized biomass plants that are operating or under construction in the UK at the moment, all of which generate clean, green energy which is great for the environment.

Community benefits

We are a new industry in your community and we know that means we need to work hard to make sure our project brings as many benefits as possible.

NEW JOB OPPORTUNITIES

BOLSTERING THE LOCAL ECONOMY

FAQs

How does a biomass power plant work?

Biomass plants work in much the same way as a coal fired power station. The biomass, in our case waste wood, is processed, chipped and then burnt at really high temperatures. This heat is used to turn water into steam which then powers a turbine, generating electricity. This energy is then carried by cable to the national grid to be used across the region.